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Hope Valley Transition

To date, Transition Hope Valley have…

  • Organised energy audits in 4 public buildings in the valley. These have  led to plans to improve energy efficiency, and to awareness of what can be done spreading amongst people who use these buildings.
  • Ran a successful Carbon Reduction course – learning how to reduce our carbon footprint.
  • Put on four successful annual Coppice Days (in collaboration with the National Trust),
  • Run the annual Hope Valley Apple Day for 8 years, and the Great Hope Valley Apple Bakeoff
  • produced a local food questionnaire to gauge interest in the possibility of growing food locally, explored options for Community Supported Agriculture, and published a local food map from this. (Still a work in progress.)
  • worked with existing groups on energy production, creating orchards and community woodland areas.
  • Got lots of people along to a varied range of speaker meetings, on topics relating to sustainability,  raising awareness, knowledge, and energy.
  • networked with other groups in the region wherever possible in co-operation with Live and Work Rural and the Peak National Authority.

If you want to know more,  contact us at transition hope valley and join in the creation of a greener and brighter Hope Valley.

About the Transition movement

The transition movement has grown as a response to the twin threats of environmental destruction (such as climate change), and of using up our natural resources (such as oil).  Rather than starting from a position of doom and gloom, it encourages us to develop ways of living where living better goes hand in hand with living sustainably.  Our lives can be  more congenial, and our communities fairer and more resilient, as we respond to the need to live in a sustainable way.

The transition approach is not to wait for politicians and corporations to solve our problems for us,  but to take power into our own hands, and to do it for ourselves.